• Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    1966-67
    mahogany with mirrored glass panes and brass fittings
    6 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    c. 1966
    rosewood with mirrored glass panes, and brass fittings
    16 3/4 x 17 x 2 1/2 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    c.1964
    rosewood with glass panes, steel ball steel rods, and brass fittings
    9 x 9 x 9 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    c. 1964
    mahogany with steel ball, shaped brass rods, glass panes, and brass fittings
    6 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 6 1/2 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    The Silence
    1965
    rosewood with mirrored glass panes and brass fittings
    5 x 5 x 5 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    The Silence (detail)
    1965
    rosewood with mirrored glass panes and brass fittings
    5 x 5 x 5 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    c.1965
    mahogany with mirrored glass panes, cotton, and brass fittings
    24 x 2 1/2 x 1 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    c.1960s
    wooden cigar box with mahogany framing and mirrored glass panes
    6 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    1963
    mahogany with rosewood framing, metal rings and rods, painted cork ball, glass pane, and brass fittings
    7 1/2 x 6 1/4 x 3 1/2 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Untitled
    c. 1965
    rosewood with mirrored glass panes, steel ball, brass rods and fittings
    3 1/2 x 3 1/2 x 2 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Silent Column
    c. 1966
    mahogany with mirrored glass panes, and brass fittings
    21 x 5 x 3 1/4 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    Portrait
    c.1964
    mahogany with glass panes, steel ball, steel rod, glass ring, and brass fittings
    5 1/2 x 5 1/4 x 3 3/4 inches

  • Rodney Quiriconi
    No. IV
    c.1966
    mahogany with mirrored glass panes, brass fittings
    10 1/4 x 2 x 1 1/2 inches

  • Installation view


PRESS RELEASE

 

Rodney Quiriconi (b. Chicago, 1933) was well known in Chicago in the 1960s and ‘70s.  One of the only artists of the era to have drawn extensively on Minimalism, Quiriconi was neighbors with H.C. Westermann, whose use of rare woods directly influenced him. At the outset of the 1960s, he was working as a painter, but gradually moved into making intricate, exquisitely crafted box constructions, using metal, glass, wood, and mirror.  The earliest boxes were relatives of Joseph Cornell’s, with similar roots in a Surrealist collage sensibility, but deeper into the 1960s they became more stripped down and experimental.

Over the years, Quiriconi was associated with several legendary Chicago galleries, including Dell and Phyllis Kind, and he participated in numerous exhibitions at the Hyde Park Art Center.  This is the first solo presentation of a group of his vintage works in over thirty years.

A full-color, 16-page catalog, with an essay by John Corbett, accompanies the exhibition.