• Jimmy Wright
    Airport Red Carpet
    1972
    graphite and colored pencil on paper
    23 x 28 3/4 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Baptism at Rives
    1980
    oil on canvas
    14 x 14 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Baptism at Pilot Oak
    1980
    oil on canvas
    14 x 14 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Baptism at Obion River
    1980
    oil on canvas
    11 x 11 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Veiled Women (1,2 & 3)
    1970
    bronze

  • Jimmy Wright
    Sister Colley
    1971
    acrylic on stoneware
    10 x 9 x 15 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Eat
    1972
    graphite on paper
    22 x 30 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Backyard
    1971
    graphite on paper
    22 x 30 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Main Street
    1972
    oil on canvas
    66 x 90 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Motel
    1972
    graphite on paper
    22 x 30 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Reclining Figure
    1970
    watercolor and graphite on paper
    22.5 x 30 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Red Drape
    1972
    graphite and colored pencil on paper
    30 x 22 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Mrs. French
    1971
    acrylic on stoneware
    16 x 8 x 9 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Subway
    1972
    oil on canvas
    90 x 66 inches

  • Jimmy Wright
    Taxi
    1972
    oil on canvas
    40 x 40 inches


PRESS RELEASE

Paintings, drawings, sculpture and prints by one of the unsung early Chicago imagists, Jimmy Wright, now a renowned New York artist, spotlighting his rarely seen work from the ’60s and early ’70s. This exhibition of nearly 50 pieces will include many never-exhibited works on paper from Wright’s period in Chicago (the majority of which was destroyed in a catastrophic fire in the early ’70s), including two Maxwell Street etchings from 1966 (a copy of one of which hangs in the Roger Brown Study Collection), as well as his bronze and ceramic sculptures from the same period. Close friend of Philip Hanson and Roger Brown, Wright studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago from 1964-1968. Wright’s uncommonly rich graphite drawings and enormous acrylic paintings from his several subsequent years downstate in Carbondale, Illinois, will also be on exhibit, as will a number of his large cityscape paintings of New York, painted just as he moved there in 1974, and a collection of his wickedly funny homoerotic baptism paintings and other scenes mixing eroticism and religion. One large sunflower painting completed this year will bring the show forward to Wright’s present work, which has been hailed by The New Yorker as “…van Gogh on acid.”