Touch and Go : Ray Yoshida and his Spheres of Influence (Sullivan Galleries of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Feb. 12, 2011 - Nov. 13, 2011

Main Gallery

View

Installation view

Artist unknown, Mexican mask from Ray Yoshida's collection

Ray Yoshida


Jizz and Jazz
1971
acrylic on canvas
50.25 x 40 inches

Ted Halkin

Untitled
c. 1968
oil on canvas
8 x 8 inches

Ray Yoshida

Indeliberate Dissociation
1977
acrylic on canvas
24 x 36 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
1967
lucite box with collage
8 x 10 x 2 inches

Installation view

Gladys Nilsson

Armport
1967
acrylic on Plexiglas in artist's frame
7.5 x 8.5 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
1972
acrylic on collage
46 x 40 inches

Jordan Davies

Untitled
c. 1969
acrylic on canvas
63 x 53.25 inches

Installation view

Evelyn Statsinger

Static Flight
1977
oil on linen
48 x 38 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
c. 1970
acrylic on canvas
50 x 46 inches

Miyoko Ito

Interior Landscape
1973
oil on canvas
47 x 40 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
c. 1974
acrylic on canvas
46 x 40 inches

Barbara Rossi

Beach Dancing
1977
acrylic on masonite
39.25 x 51.25 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
1975
acrylic on canvas
48 x 40 inches

Mark Booth

The "R" in Ray
1999
enamel on canvas over plywood box frame
16 x 16 x 6 inches

Ray Yoshida

Comic Book Specimen #1
1968
collage on paper
17 x 23 inches

Brian Calvin

Olive, Upon Entering
1993
acrylic and enamel on canvas
54 x 72 inches

Mary Lou Zelazny

Polonaise No. 13, Stars and Sticks
1996
oil on canvas
9.75 x 20.25 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
1969
collage on paper
11 x 9 inches

Richard Hull

Untitled
c. 1979
oil and wax ground on canvas
9 x 13 inches

William Schwedler

Fallen Table
1965
oil on canvas
22 x 22 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
c. 1969
collage on paper
11 x 8.5 inches

Frank Piatek

Untitled
1967
oil on canvasboard
24 x 23.5 inches (irregular)

Ray Yoshida, Christina Ramberg, Barbara Rossi


Wrapsodent

1974
graphite, colored pencil, and collage on paper
11 x 15 inches

Ray Yoshida

Superficial Concerns
c. 1970
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches

Suellen Rocca

Foot Smells
c. 1967
oil on canvas
19 x 15 inches

Joseph Yoakuml

Mt. Mauna Kea
c. 1968
ballpoint pen and colored pencil on paper
9.5 x 12 inches

Ray Yoshida, Christina Ramberg, Barbara Rossi

Tripple Twins
1974
graphite, colored pencil, and collage on paper
21.5 x 40.75 inches

Ray Yoshida

Graceful Flattery
c. 1970
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches

Martin Ramirez

Untitled
1940s
graphite and crayon on paper
34 x 24 inches

Peter Saul

Men/Please
1964
pastel and ink on paper
21.5 x 30 inches

Karl Wirsum

Lana Turner with Her Own Eyebrows Before Schrafft's Drug Store
c. 1969
acrylic on canvas
36 x 21 inches

Ray Yoshida

Dotted Charmer
c. 1970
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches

Philip Hanson

Country Club Dance
1969
oil on canvas with artist's frame
29 x 29 inches

Öyvind Fahlström

Notes for Babies
1963
tempera, India ink, and graphite on paper laid on rag board
18 x 17 inches

Roger Brown

Untitled
1968
oil on canvas with artist's frame
12 x 12 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
c. 1995
oil on canvas
36 x 48 inches

Roger Brown

Cutting the Rug
c. 1969
mixed media assemblage
25.5 x 12 inches

Jim Nutt

Stage Fright (I'm drying too ruin her!)
1968
colored pencil, graphite, collage, ink on paper mounted on silver mat board
44 x 28 inches

Chris Ware

Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth
1998
ink on museum board
30 x 18 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
c. 1964
oil on canvas
32.5 x 31.5 inches

Christina Ramberg

Gloved
1974
acrylic on masonite
46.25 x 35.5 inches

Philip Hanson

Untitled
1968
metal cut-out and springs in pine frame
12.5 x 13.5 inches

Ray Yoshida

Untitled
1974
felt-tip pen on paper, cut out and collaged on heavy paper
19.25 x 24.25 inches

Press Release

CHICAGO—Presented in the Sullivan Galleries of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and curated by John Corbett and Jim Dempsey, Touch and Go is the largest and most extensive gathering of works ever devoted to the influential painter and collage-maker, Ray Yoshida (American, 1930–2009). This exhibition is the first large-scale show since the artist’s death, and the first to comprehensively examine Yoshida’s oeuvre in relation to his life in an educational institution, both as a student and a teacher.Yoshida was a driving force in the Chicago art world for nearly half a century.  Born in Hawaii, he received his undergraduate degree from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in 1953, and attended Syracuse University for his MFA in 1958. The following year Yoshida returned to Chicago, and SAIC, and began a teaching career that would span four decades.  Working primarily as a painter and collagist, Yoshida was formally resourceful, subtly humorous, and often startlingly original. Movement between abstraction and figuration in his work resulted in an art historical arc that was at once logical in its development and full of surprising turns and reprises. In the early 1960s Yoshida was celebrated for his earthy, soft, and painterly canvases. Gradually, over the next decade, his style morphed into a hard-edged, pop aesthetic. In the late 1960s he began to paint and collage works steeped in rigorous studies of folk and self-taught artists; vernacular imagery including street signs, tattoos, and commercial advertising; and perhaps most notably, mainstream and underground comics.  One of Yoshida’s signature ideas was the result of a direct intervention in comic art, his important “comic specimen” collage series in which he appropriated fragments from comic books, arranging them in neat typological categories or amassing them into surrealistic body-part aggregates.Parallel to these artistic explorations, as a professor Yoshida helped stimulate a cadre of young Chicagoans with their own unique sensibility – the brash, iconoclastic artists known as the Imagists.  Most of the Imagists (including Roger Brown, Ed Flood, Art Green, Philip Hanson, Jim Nutt, Christina Ramberg, Suellen Rocca, and Barbara Rossi,), along with several subsequent generations of budding artists, studied at SAIC with Yoshida.  Indeed, understanding Yoshida’s legacy as a teacher, and more generally as a part of the larger Chicago art community, is arguably essential to a full understanding of his artwork and the significant developments it underwent during his lifetime. Yoshida was uncommonly open to input from his students, taking inspiration in his own work from their new discoveries. Yoshida was a sympathetic yet brutally honest, sometimes productively enigmatic instructor, and many of his relationships with his SAIC students quickly developed into collegial friendships. He supported generations of young Chicago artists as they emerged into the public sphere, and engaged with them privately in a vigorous intellectual exchange.The exhibition runs from November 13, 2010 – February 12, 2011.A full-color, 144-page catalog accompanies the exhibition.